Dettling 51 Motoryacht ‘QB 111’ Delivery from Edgewater, MD to Cardinal, VA by Captain Jerry Taylor

One of our favorite boats.

October, 2018

Jerry and Wendy’s Excellent Adventures……..

“A small adventure is better than no adventure at all.”

Our two day 123 NM adventure

Day One:
We drive a rental car 5 hours to Edgewater Md, quickly check out and familiarize ourselves with the boat, return the rental car to Annapolis, are driven back to the marina and move boat to the fuel dock, we fill the fuel and water tanks, and get underway ASAP to arrive before dark in Solomons, MD.
Day Two:
We depart at dawn from Solomons and arrive at Zimmerman Marine, Cardinal two hours before low tide to be able to enter the tiny harbor entrance at the boatyard. After cleaning the exterior and interior, we turn the boat over to Zimmerman Marine with a copy of our log and a list of recommendations, and return to our Z36 Zimmerang, moored nearby.
This was our second Dettling 51 delivery. Ed Dettling built these exquisitely crafted motor yachts without compromise in Trappe, MD. Like many boat builders, his creations were limited production, expensive, and appreciated by a limited number of people who could afford them. And like many boat builders, eventually went out of business because their high quality standards couldn’t support a profitable business model. Dettling produced yachts with very advanced engineering that simplified access to all the systems, and integrated the complete yacht into a thing of efficiency beauty and speed.

Delivery Summary

Total Distance: 123 NM

Total Running Hours: 10

Average Speed: 12.3 Knots

To find out more about our services please
visit our website at: www.tayloryachtdelivery.com
email us at captjt@riverreach.net
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Marlow Explorer Motor Yacht ‘White Lightning’ Delivery and On Board Training Captain Jerry Taylor

Almost around Florida

IMG_0096January 2013

Our rental car drive from Ft Lauderdale to Bradenton was uneventful, unlike our experiences over the next few days aboard the Marlow 72′ motor yacht.
We found ‘White Lightning,’ and her proud new owners David and Helen Bruckman at Twin Dolphin Marina enjoying a ‘best wishes’ final visit from their broker Kathy Quam from Marlow Marine Sales. Our quick review of spare parts on board, indicated we needed Racor fuel elements, and raw water impellers and belts for the C18 Cats and the two generators. The boats final IMG_0076IMG_0083destination and new home was to be Lyford Cay in the Bahamas, where parts are more expensive and sometimes difficult to find, so this area of the “prep” became more important.

We spent as much time as possible going over the boat’s systems with the new owners, some basic knots and line handling
The next morning after a spare parts delivery, we departed Bradenton for the Gulf of Mexico and then south to Venice. By the end of the day, the owners had decided that the most economical cruising speed for the trip would be 8 knots, around 1000 rpm for the 1000 HP Cats, and that they wanted to go through Marathon and NE to the Bahama Bank and over to Nassau, rather than through the Okeechobee and SE to the Bahamas. This presented several IMG_0080IMG_0088challenges. Firstly, the Okeechobee route provides a much richer teaching environment for boat handling with protected water, including the lake crossing, busy narrow channels, and 5 locks and several bridges. Secondly, the distance from Marco Island to Marathon required settled weather and a very early start to accomplish in daylight at 8 knots, with the trickiest shallow section being the final 10 miles to Marathon.
With a settled forecast we departed Venice at 0715 Saturday morning, and ran the 80 NM down to Marco Island. While navigating the Marco entrance and ICW to the Factory Bay Marina, the basic flaw in the Marathon plan became obvious – LOW TIDE!. With a draft of almost 6 feet (measured while in the slings IMG_0091during survey), depth in the Marco channel and ICW as we made our entrance, was between 6 and 7 feet in some spots. The next morning at our early departure time, the tide would be not only be dead low, but also a minus tide. A phone call to the local Tow Boat US operator confirmed that our earliest departure time would not be until 0900, in his words, “Or I will be pulling you off the sandbar!” A certain amount of consternation followed our announcement of these facts, and the need for a revised plan for the next day. Two choices – Run the boat at cruise RPM around 17 knots and to Marathon in daylight, or go back to Ft Meyers at 8 knots and into the Okeechobee waterway. After several hours of going over times and distances David and Helen decided they would rather go back to Ft Meyers than burn the extra fuel to get to Marathon before dark.
White Lightning Marlow 72 2013Next morning at 1000 we departed for the San Carlos Pass to Ft Meyers and the Okeechobee Waterway, and despite heavy Sunday traffic we reached Rialto Yacht Harbor at MM# 119 at 1700.
Monday was spent navigating 4 locks, crossing Lake Okeechobee, learning basic knots, going over the rules of the road and finally reaching River Forest Marina at SM# 16 just at dark at 1800.
On Tuesday, after transiting the St Lucie Lock we wound our way into Manatee Pocket for fuel, then continued on down the ICW towards Ft Lauderdale in very strong and blustery Easterly conditions offshore, making it inadvisable to run outside.
By Wednesday it was evident that David and Helen would have to wait a few days for the weather to moderate before crossing the Gulf Stream to the Bahamas. So we departed ‘White Lightning’ at Harbour Towne Marina in Ft Lauderdale having travelled 365 NM together, transited 5 locks and added 50 engine hours.
Delivery Summary
Total Distance: 365 NM
Total Running Hours: 50
Average Speed: 7.3 Knots
To find out more about our services please visit our website at www.tayloryachtdelivery.com
or email us at captjt@riverreach.net

Horizon 64 Motor Yacht ‘Semper Fi’ Delivery from Fajardo, PR to Ft Lauderdale, FL Captain Jerry Taylor

IMG_1470With Yacht Delivery; even the best laid plans……..

August 2010

I had no idea the amazing number of surprises that lay in wait for us when we stepped aboard the 64′ Horizon Motor Yacht ‘Semper Fi.’
Wendy, Alan and I had flown to San Juan, PR with our delivery gear and a big bag of spare parts, after the full time captain of the past four years had told the owner that the boat could ‘not IMG_0013IMG_1362make it to Florida.’
The sleek 64′ ex charter boat bobbed expectantly in it’s slip at Puerto Del Rey Marina, as if to say, “Welcome aboard suckers, I’ve been expecting you.” We originally had estimated our preparation time at two to three days. This proved a tad optimistic, especially after finding the house battery bank installed on the floor of the main salon! A quick glance in the engine room revealed one of the worst scenes of chaos we have ever seen, and prompted our immediate desire to return to the airport, which we resisted, as in 30 plus years of yacht delivery we have never abandoned a boat. One of the two shore power cords was completely melted, so there was no air conditioning on board when we IMG_1385IMG_1409arrived, and this only added to our general testiness. The disgruntled ex-captain, after reluctantly returning the ships papers and ignition keys that he had removed and hidden before our arrival, departed with the words “I really hope you make it, but I don’t think you will!” As soon as he was gone, we got ourselves to work. Twelve days of ‘dawn to dark’ laboring and ‘bilge ratting,’ finally saw us ready to depart for Ft Lauderdale.
This is a brief accounting of how we began the necessary preparations:
** Replaced 2 inoperative bilge pumps, 1 inoperative float IMG_1428IMG_1438switch and 1  shower sump pump.
** Rebuilt the cooling system on the 20K Generator including the heat exchanger core bundle, replaced the cracked and weeping exhaust elbow, replaced raw water pump, alternator belt, replaced the raw water hose from sea strainer to raw water pump, and repaired or replaced obvious broken and “cooked” wiring.
** Cleaned gallons of dirty engine oil and water under both main engine pans.
** Replaced the raw water impellers on both main engines.
** Jury rigged an insulated welding blanket around the starboard Cat’s deteriorated exhaust elbow. Previously, the insulation had deteriorated and fallen off, with the result of melting the plastic sight glass, dumping gallons of diesel  fuel in the bilge. We replaced the sight glass, of course.
IMG_1444IMG_1422** Tightened every accessible hose clamp throughout the vessel, and assisted the local Cat mechanic with some long delayed repairs.
** Had a diver clean the bottom and running gear, which took 5 hours of scraping and two or three tanks of air.
** Replaced the plastic garden hose on the propane system with approved hose, and filled the propane tanks.
When the numerous electrical problems overcame my ability to cope. I called the owner and requested reinforcement.
He  
agreed to have our friend and omni competent electrical genius, Scott Wiley fly down the next day. When Scotty arrived with additional spare parts and his fantastic energy, we set about working on the following:

Loose battery in engine roomIMG_1447** Replaced the Hynautic reservoir and bled the throttle and shift system to bring it back to life.
** Replaced the rusted and worn out shift rods on both ZF transmissions.
** Diagnosed the problem in the main charging system as a melted contact on the main battery switch, not allowing any charge from the port alternator to the main 24v DC battery bank.
** Diagnosed the inverter/charger as ‘fried.’ Scotty wired around that problem and continued.
** Provided a back up charging system for the electronics to keep us going if the generator IMG_1403IMG_1452failed.
After all of the above was completed, along with numerous other small tasks going on simultaneously, we took her out for a short sea trial. We ran the Cats for an hour or so at our planned cruise rpm with no hiccups, and returned to the marina to top up the fuel tanks and go to our slip.
We provisioned the boat, and departed Puerto Rico early morning on Sunday August 15, setting our course for Ocean World Marina in the Dominican Republic. As soon as we cleared the protected waters of the East end of the island, it was clear that we had totally overlooked repairing one important item – the closing mechanism for the large glass sliding door! The only way to hold the door closed was to use IMG_1457the turn latch on the inside. The latch mechanism and the outside key hardware were all missing! This made running the boat from the upper station nearly impossible, so the decision was made to all stay at the lower station. Thirty three hours later we cleared Customs, fixed a few small items including rigging a temporary compass light, and spent a quiet night in the marina. After clearing out with the Dominican officialdom who were very nice, no ‘mordida’ as in the old days, we cast off for the Bahamas. 44 hours of untroubled running later, we docked at Georgetown, Exuma for fuel and clearance into the Bahamas. We had a great dinner ashore at Eddy’s Edgewater, a good nights rest, and Semper Fi Horizon 62 2010departed the next morning for Highbourne Cay, where we topped the fuel and water tanks, had dinner on board, and set out early the next morning for the final 215 NM to Ft Lauderdale. We arrived off Port Everglades at dawn, made our way to the dock on SE 14th St, called US Customs, obtained our clearance and went ashore for breakfast.
‘Semper Fi’ ran without missing a beat, thanks to our diligent preparation and the fact that the weather was almost perfect, with only one rough stretch off Caicos.
The next day we turned her over to a happy, satisfied and very relieved owner.
Delivery Summary
Total Distance: 1002 NM
Total Running Hours: 107
Average Speed: 9.3 knots @ 900 RPM
To find out more about our services please visit our website at www.tayloryachtdelivery.com
or email us at captjt@riverreach.net