Krogen 42 Trawler ‘Dragonwyck’ Yacht Delivery by Captain Jerry Taylor from Port Severn, Ontario to Newport, RI.

Trent Severn Adventures

September, 2015

When we arrived, we found Dragonwyck sitting  forlorne, high, dry, and broken, alone in Forever Exploring Krogen 42 2015a far corner of the boatyard in Port Severn, Ontario.

The boatyard figured it had a winter project before we arrived, as it was late September and decisions had to be made if Dragonwick was to leave before the first snowfall.

Wendy began making the priority list as I poked around in the engine room, calling up my findings as to what needed to be done, before we could launch and depart.
The next seven days were a whirlwind of activity, as we replaced the prop shaft, engine oil cooler, raw water impellers on the Lehman and Generator, had the prop trued and balanced, replaced the Tides Marine Lip Seal assembly, replaced cracked hoses, got all the bilge pumps working, replaced windshield wiper blades, and a dozen other small but necessary tasks.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Launch day finally arrived, we fueled the boat at a nearby marina and set out the next morning for our first trip on the Trent Severn Waterway, underway at last, bound for Newport RI.

 

 

 

 

 

Volumes have been written about the Trent Severn. ‘Loopers’ have covered just about every aspect of this beautiful trip through the Canadian countryside. Our highest complement is to say, “We’d love to do it again!”

 

 

 

 

 

By the time we had done the last lock and were ready for our crossing of Lake Ontario just about every electrical system on the boat had broken or was intermittent. We lost the stern thruster on the third day. We had a serious hydraulic leaks in two of the stabilizer hoses that we removed and replaced while tied to a lock wall, near Peterborough. The GPS plotter went south, so we taped our ‘back up’ iPads on the dash and continued on. The VHF radio took a vacation, so we used our hand held VHF. Even the compass was almost impossible to read as it was an old flat topped design.
The good news was that the Ford Lehman engine was reliable and strong, the depth finder continued to work, and that the Krogen 42 is a wonderful boat.
After clearing US Customs in Oswego NY, we made our way through the remaining canal and locks to the Hudson River, and since our mast was still down, transited under the low bridges on the the Harlem River and finally entered Long Island Sound.
Our final miles to Newport were spiced by deteriorating weather conditions, with the approach of a cold front. We were secure in the harbor before the strong NE winds found us. The new owners met us on the mooring in Newport harbor, and were very happy to have their boat rescued from a frozen Canadian winter.

To find out more about our services please
visit our website at: 
www.tayloryachtdelivery.com
email us at captjt@riverreach.net

Krogen 48 Trawler ‘Marie Louise’ Delivery from St Petersburg, FL to Portsmouth, NH by Captain Jerry Taylor

We renew our acquaintance with an old friend

May/June 2018

Day 1:
We decided to practice what we preach and waited a wet and windy week for a gigantic low pressure system to vacate the Florida Gulf Coast. The drive across Aligator Alley early this morning was pleasantly uneventful, and we arrived at the Krogen 48 ‘Marie Louise II’, ex ‘Midnight Sun’ in St Petersburg mid day.
ML II is a Krogen 48 that we were involved with for over six years when she was brand new in 2002. We delivered her back and forth from New Hampshire to Florida and a trip to Maine with the original owners. For some unknown reason we continue with a warm friendship with these lovely people. Tomorrow we’ll provision and do some basic prep work, with an early start on Sunday morning to be on our way back to New Hampshire for the present owners. Hopefully this will result in another years long friendship. PS; The weather is now perfect for beginning our next ‘Excellent Adventure.’
Day 2:
While Wendy emptied the shelves at Fresh Market and Trader Joe’s with a final pit stop at Publix, I toiled in the engine room and made sure “All the dogs were barking.” We changed out an old plastic hose with a reinforced rubber hose that feeds cooling water to the stuffing box, (not a five minute job), replaced the air cleaner in the Walker Air Sep, tightened every hose clamp within reach, and ran and checked all systems, of which there are a bunch. Old home week on a great boat with a lot of miles and memories. It was evident that the current owners have invested much time and energy in bringing her back up to ‘yacht condition’. Hopefully we’ll make our escape early tomorrow morning. St Petersburg is a lovely city, but we have 1725 miles to go before we sleep.
Day 3:
A good 12 hour run today overall, although it got a bit snotty the last four hours before we could turn into the Boca Grand channel. We’re tied snugly to the dock at Boca Grand marina. It’s a good thing they don’t know we’re ‘boat trash.’ This is definitely high roller country with prices to match. We are dining aboard tonight after checking the menus and prices on Yelp at the various local bistros. Entering the OWW tomorrow, Okeechobee Waterway for those of you new to the neighborhood. Dockage and anchorage is a tad sketchy along this 150 Mile stretch. Hard to plan ahead as the marinas are few and far between, and many deigned not return phone inquiries as to space available. “Tis what it Tis,” and  we press onward tomorrow.
Day 4 and 5:
If canal cruising is your thing, then the Okeechobee is for you. We tied up two nights ago night at the Moorehaven city dock. At $1.00 per foot including power it’s a bargain.
An early start the next day was nullified by transiting locks and a railroad bridge under repair making a long day longer.
Tied up last night at Sunset Bay Marina in Stuart, a first rate facility with prices to match. Northbound this morning at last, there’s a large area of disturbed weather coming to Florida and the Gulf in a few more days. It’s time to vacate the premises and be on our way.
Day 6:
Last night was spent peacefully at anchor. The night before we were at the dock in Stuart. We stand on the side of Steve McQueen, who once said, “I’d rather wake up in the middle of nowhere than in any city on earth!” Yesterday we ran 100nm, a 14 hour day at the helm. We share one hour watches throughout the day when doing the ICW ‘inside,’ ‘outside’ routine. If the trip is to be run offshore, ‘outside,’ we take a third crew person and run 24/7. A lot of couples cruisers run 24 hour legs offshore, then spend 24 hours tied up or at anchor, trying to regain their sense of humor. Fatigue plays a huge part in bad decisions and screwups. We try to avoid fatigue, as there are plenty of chances for screwups available even when well rested.
We’re privileged to be able to deliver million dollar boats for some very nice folks who put their trust in us, and maintaining that trust is a full time job.
Day 07:
Well, it went something like this, after we’d upped anchor, and were underway a few hours, “If we go outside at Ponce Inlet, we could make St Augustine. “It’s another 12 hour day, but what the hell, let’s go for it!” It was a fantastic day offshore, and well worth another long day at the helm. Marie Louise has a durable John Deere engine and a world class active fin stabilization system, so even when the ocean decides to get ‘Nautical,’ we’re good to go. Tomorrow will be a short day. We’ll stop in Jacksonville and replenish the fruits and veggie locker, and do a few domestic chores to keep a happy ship and a happy crew.
Day 8:
An early stop at Palm Cove Marina in Jacksonville Beach let us attend to some provisioning and boat chores yesterday. The photo is of the air conditioning sea strainer. It was packed with moss and tiny barnacles. South Floridas warm water promotes this kind of growth in a very short time. We once found a good sized fish in a sea strainer, it had gotten in as a minnow and grew and grew. Another example of blind ambition leading to an unscheduled end. We’re offshore again today as we speak. The stinky pulp mill stacks of Fernandina 5 miles off our port beam. Today’s exact destination unknown, until we select a spot to anchor for the night somewhere up a creek in Georgia’s lonely marshlands. Meanwhile, Sub Tropical Storm Alberto is festering away near the Gulf of Mexico, we’ll have to see how that will affect our excellent adventures in the next few days.
Day 9:
We had a pretty good run today. Out at the St John’s river Florida and in at St Simons Georgia. 92 NM in nice conditions. However, this being a boat, the air conditioning decided to take a vacation. Now we know that doesn’t sound serious to most folks, but at this time of year the large biting flies are out for our blood. Without screening, they will have their way with us. So as we motor along, they plastered on all windows wanting in, and us held captive inside sweating. For some reason they depart at sundown and return an hour or two after sunrise. We power on, with thousands of small viscous hitchhiking vampires awaiting their chance.
Day 10:
Another short day today. We stopped in Thunderbolt Ga after contacting Jesse from Edge HVAC this Sunday morning. He was recommended by our friend Ken Youngchild of Thunderbolt Marine. Jesse arrived at 1400 and had the A/C up and running by 1500, this accomplished on a major three day holiday weekend. It pays to have friends in low places. Thanks Ken! Thanks Jesse! The rain and squally weather from Alberto finally caught up with us. Every great boating day is not necessarily a sunny day.
Day 11:
Here we are anchored for the night on Toogoodoo Creek in beautiful South Carolina.
The best part of today was discovering that the dreaded shallows of the Coosaw Cut had just been dredged. We transited around two hours after low tide and found 12 to 15 Ft. However a dredge was partially blocking the southern entrance as we approached. Tried calling on the VHF on channel 13 and 16 with no response, and as we slowly passed by discovered that we’re skidding through soft mud in front of the dredge. No harm done, but it would have been nice to speak to the dredge. The weather was overcast, but no rain. All in all, a good 77 NM run without incident.
Day 13:
We left early this morning from Harborwalk Marina in Georgetown, SC, a nice place with excellent staff, by the way. We stopped at Grand Dunes Marina to refuel which took over two hours, and you guessed it, buy fresh groceries at the Lowes Market across the street. The dock master Lynn, and her daughter made us feel right at home, and are friendly and helpful beyond the call of duty. We later discovered some issues in the engine room and took care of them. Where does the time go?
Day 14:
An early exit from Grand Dunes in Myrtle Beach netted us over 80 NM today to fetch up at Harbor Village. Tomorrow we hope to push past Beaufort, NC and be anchored or tied up another 80 or 90 miles along. Today we passed the ‘half way’ point of this delivery. Sometimes this is accompanied by the mid trip blues. So far, the blues have been kept at bay, due in part to the amount of concentration necessary in keeping ‘Marie Louise’ off the shallow and ever changing bottom. Twenty Years ago we sailed the ICW with a 7′ draft. Today if we tried that, we’d become temporary real estate. There are at least six areas now that with a 4 1/2 to 5′ draft you must ‘play’ the tides to get through safely.
Day 15:
We’re anchored in splendid solitude tonight in Campbell Creek, NC, another 100 NM toward our objective. Our before dawn departure netted us a fantastic sunrise, then after an hour or two the auto pilot went on a temporary leave of absence. “Drat, shucks  and Dog gone!” we exclaimed in mutual dismay and disappointment. Once we got out on to the wide Neuse River we had a chance to do some troubleshooting. Swatting the same blood thirsty flies I climbed down in to the lazz and found the culprit. An overheated and stuck ‘open’ 12v solenoid which was repaired by a sharp rap with the handle of a screwdriver. We called a tech in Chesapeake, VA and will meet him on Monday morning and replace the ‘sticky’ solenoid.
Day 16:
Somehow we managed to endure the seemingly endless Alligator Pungo Cut today with patience and Zen like calm. A narrow channel and 20 miles of Kudzu and stumps close on either side. It feels like being sprung from a dark green dungeon when at last you find your way out. The mighty Albermarle Sound gave us a pass today, with light southerly breezes. We’ve been thrashed there numerous times. Anchored tonight south of Coinjock, NC, we  decided to give their gigantic prime rib a miss. Not a difficult decision for us. Tomorrow we’ll stop early at Atlantic Yacht Basin and go in search of a new solenoid for the auto pilot. We’ve just completed 1060 NM with only 665 to go. Onwards!
Day 18:
Today we escaped from the ICW. We swept by Mile 0 in Norfolk and motored happily onto the beautiful blue green Chesapeake. After the technician from Ayers Electronics found a bad power connection, then set up and calibrated the auto pilot we were good to go. So, go we did. We made the noon opening of the Great Bridge Bridge and locked on through the Great Bridge Lock. We’re anchored this evening on Chisman Creek off the Poquoson River. Quiet and Secure. Wendy is simmering a Beef Bourgogne fo our dinner this evening, I just saw her pour in a half bottle of red wine, “Oh boy, oh boy!”
Day 19:
For us, the Chesapeake is like coming home. If we could abolish winter we’d live here forever. In addition to the times we pass through on deliveries, the Bay is our summer home aboard our own boat, and has been for the past 16 years. Last night’s sunset on Chisman Creek was worth the price of admission. Tonight we’re tied up at Spring Cove Marina in Solomons MD and a short walk away is Island Sushi, also worth the price of admission.
Day 20:
We did another 90 NM run today from Solomons to Chesapeake City on the C and D Canal. Our plan was to go further and anchor at Reedy Point on the Delaware River. To accomplish this we were under way at 0530. However, tomorrows timing of the current on the Delaware had other ideas. Better to stop here tonight and “Push” 2 hours of strong current in the morning, rather than motoring on tonight and then “Push” 4 hours of opposing current tomorrow. We hope to make Atlantic City tomorrow, then on to New York the following day.
Day 21:
The booming bass notes coming from the casino bar at the head of the dock are rattling our windows. Can’t call it music exactly, at risk of admitting that anything newer than the late seventies and eighties just doesn’t sound like music to us. We did 110 NM today, with a favorable current on the Delaware pulling us along at 10 to 11 knots most of the morning. The New Jersey coast was benign for a change, with similar wind and seas forecast for tomorrow. We caught up with the ‘Misty Pearl’ a Selene 43 we trained the new owners on last March. They are off on the first part of the Great Loop adventure. We joined them this evening with 6 other loopers.
Day 22:
What a day! Light southerly breezes and a strong northerly setting current that helped us along the entire 87 NM from Atlantic City to the warm and friendly Great Kills Yacht Club. The loopers we met last night were reluctant to do the run in one day and planned to stop in Manasquan, even after we cautioned them about the strong river currents and narrow opening rail road bridge. The perfect weather coaxed most of them to go the full distance outside. We helped a couple of them tie up and we’re as proud as they are. For some it was a first experience on the Atlantic. Big smiles all round the dock tonight. Tomorrow we’re off to Long Island Sound and the loopers head up the Hudson. It was fun sharing the day with them.
Day 23:
Who among us can resist taking photos of New York and the Statue of Liberty? Every time we enter or leave NY Harbor, travelling up the Hudson or taking the East River to Long Island Sound, it brings on feelings of pride in this great country we’re fortunate enough to be part of. After leaving the Great Kills Yacht Club we made our way to the Hudson with favorable current all the way to the East River, where it turned against us with a vengeance. Not our first time through Hell’s Gate, but it’s always best to catch the ride with following current. This time we made our way against it through tide rips and whirlpools, dodging oncoming shipping who were clever enough to be going the opposite direction. Once under the Throgs Neck Bridge, the current became our friend and we hitched on for a wonderful day on Long Island Sound, making 9 to 91/2 knots all the way to Cedar Island Marina in Clinton, CT.
Day 24:
Another fine day in New England. Long Island Sound and Buzzards Bay were on their very best behavior, if you were in a power boat that is. The glassy calm and zero wind was totally frustrating for all the sail boats we saw today. Brought back a lot of memories of our sailing days. Anchored tonight in Onset Harbor, in hope of a quiet night and another early departure. We should arrive close to our destination tomorrow evening, tie up at Wentworth by the Sea Marina, then catch the flood tide the next morning for the last 7 miles.
Day 25:
Away at first light again this morning. Mighty fine anchorage in Onset Harbor, and we slept like tigers. Careful planning or dumb luck, take your pick, found us rocketing through the Cape Cod Canal at 11 to 12 knots on our way to Portsmouth. Should have taken pictures, but they would have been blurred by the G forces and our fantastic forward velocity. On our exit from the canal like a pinched  watermelon seed, we were ejected into Cape Cod Bay and on towards Cape Anne. Tonight we dine ashore at the Wentworth by the Sea Hotel Restaurant. They’ll never guess that we’re boat trash by our rasty attitude and wrinkled attire. In the morning we do the last 7 miles to the owner’s slip upriver at Great Bay Marina.
Day 26:
Well, we’re here. The current on the Piscataqua River is absolutely awesome! We caught the turn to flood this morning and by the time we were approaching the dock at Great Bay Marina it was out of control. As we approached the dock with 4 knots of current on the bow, it suddenly reversed itself due to a weird back eddy. Suddenly, now feet from the dock, we were going with the flow rather than opposing it. Downright interesting, but luckily uneventful. We spent the day cleaning the interior and exterior of ‘Marie Louise’, and tomorrow morning will do the ships laundry and make everything ready for the owners return in two weeks. We were incredibly fortunate to be ahead of or behind any bad weather, and blessed by only one or two small mechanical and electrical problems thanks to the careful preparation and attention to detail by the current owners.

Delivery Summary:

Total Distance: 1814 NM

Total Running Hours: 231

Average Speed: 7.8 Knots @ 2100 – 2150 RPM

Average Fuel Burn: 5 GPH 

To find out more about our services please visit our website at: www.tayloryachtdelivery.com
email us at captjt@riverreach.net
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Nordic Tug 42 ‘New Bearings’ Delivery from Portsmouth, RI to Charleston, SC by Captain Jerry and Wendy Taylor

ON THE ROAD AGAIN

August 2018

Day 1 thru Day 4:
Sometimes getting there and getting started is the hardest part of any yacht delivery.
We arrived in our rental car at the Nordic Tug 42 ‘New Bearings’ at the Brewer Sakonnet North Marina in Portsmouth RI, after eight stressful hours of driving in blinding rain.  White knuckles gripping the wheel, we shared the road with an uncountable number of eighteen wheelers flashing death wish tattoos in their white rooster tails of flying spray and mist.
We began our inspections and preparation for departure  early the next morning.
“Wonder where all that water in the pan under the Cummins came from?” A cautious taste determined it to be fresh water, so together we swooshed it to the back of the pan and over into the bilge sump where the pump got rid of it. We wiped the pan dry and moved along to the next task. Some time later we noticed the pan slowly filling up again. At the end of the day we still had no answer as to the origin of the leak.
The next morning we called in reinforcements and the boatyard foreman found the ‘copper tube to nowhere’! An obscure 1/4″ copper tube with a valve on each end, with the hidden valve open, it was slowly draining the fresh water tanks into the bilge. With that mystery solved, we managed some other small repairs and purchased some basic spare parts.
Did we mention it was still raining and blowing? Amid more torrential rain and small craft conditions from the southwest we provisioned and prepared for departure the next morning.
Day 5:
We departed at 0615 with a perfect weather forecast for the next two days. After 35 minutes underway we noticed a faint diesel smell, and a quick inspection of the engine room revealed a fine spray of diesel coming from a pin hole in the supply hose to the injector pump. At this point we were abeam of the Hinckley yard north of Newport, so we called the dock master and were told we could tie up at the fuel dock until Monday morning. It was so rough at the fuel dock from passing wakes, that it threw an empty coffee cup onto the galley sole, and the loud clattering sound on the bridge turned out to be a broken mast step. We contacted our friend Tony Rego who owns Portsmouth Yacht Refit Center, and he promised to be on board before 0700 to organize a new fuel hose and repair of the mast step. Only ten miles made good on our first day!
Day 6:
A fabulous day and a good run considering we had items to repair. Thanks to Tony Rego we got everything done in hyper time. I removed the leaking fuel hose, and had Tony look at the rickety mast step. Before you could say “Jack Robinson,” Tony and his guy Louis had the mast at half mast, and welded up a proper stainless step. Tony handed me a new custom fuel hose and said “install this.” Install this I did, and after a a quick check of all systems, we  fired up and were away by 0945. We caught favorable current the entire day and averaged over eleven knots all the way to Cedar Island Marina in Clinton, CT.
Day 7:
Years ago a friend from Long Island said “If the wind on the sound is in the westerly quadrant, and you want to go west, DON’T.” Dave’s prophecy was, and still is correct. We proved it today, one more time. By the time we got to Hell’s Gate on the East River, Hell looked pretty good. We were given our usual warm welcome at the Great Kills Yacht Club on Staten Island, one of our favorite stops. The club was almost completely wiped out by superstorm Sandy and needs all the support we can give them. Their rates are very reasonable and their hospitality warm. A violent squall and electrical storm struck shortly after we tied up.
Day 8:
We slipped away from GKYC at 0530  this morning, and shook hands with the Atlantic In the Sandy Hook Channel. The forecast was surprisingly optimistic after the monsoonal thrashing we received at the end of the day yesterday. We hooked up ‘New Bearings’ mighty Cummins Diesel at 1850 RPM and boogied south at ten knots for twelve hours. Even my fractured math says that’s good for 120 nautical miles. We arrived at Utches Marina in Cape May just before they closed at 1745. We showered and walked over  to the Lobster House. It looked like at least an hours wait so we bought some fresh scallops and flounder at the adjacent fish market and fixed a fine dinner on board.
Day 9, 10 and 11:
On the run up the Delaware from Cape May we noticed the acrid smell of H2SO4, caused by the bow thruster batteries going into an accelerated meltdown in the forward bilge compartment, probably indicating the cause of the thruster’s previous anemic performance. During that days run from Cape May to Annapolis we made arrangements for a battery ‘load test’ with David Able who owns and operates Solomons Yachting Center in Solomons, MD. He assured us he and his crew of sinewy young boat yard helpers could remove three hundred pounds of old cooked batteries and replace them with three hundred pounds of new  uncooked ones if the load test verified our suspicions. We again had favorable current from Annapolis to Solomons as we ran the 45 miles down the Bay, we topped the fuel tanks, and were tied up on a tee head by 1100. SYC is an unusual marina in that it comprises a marina with modern floating docks, a full service boatyard, a busy pub and pool, and a fuel dock with competitive prices. David also owns another boatyard nearby. The man never sleeps! The photos show the load test results, the batteries were ‘toast.’ That’s yours truly in the hold doing the blocking and electrical hookup, guided by David Able who wisely avoided climbing in the hold. A huge shoutout for David and his boys, for getting us operational  in very short order! The old batteries were out and the new single replacement was in the hold by the end of the day. The next morning at 1130, after blocking and completing the electrical hookup, we were on our way to Deltaville, VA.
Day 12:
Today’s run from Deltaville, VA to Coinjock, NC was wonderfully uneventful, even Railroad Bridge 7 remained open and let us pass. Early Sunday morning seems the best time to get through Norfolk. Any other day of the week is crazy with military and commercial traffic.
Day 13 and 14:
Two more long but good days on ‘New Bearings’. Coinjock, NC to Oriental, NC. Then today from Oriental, NC to Wrightsville Beach, NC. Today was divided by the current working both for and against us. Against us when trying to make a timed bridge opening, and for us as we approached an area of doubtful depths. Overall, ‘good cop, bad cop’ currents kinda canceled each other out. We tied up tonight at the Bridge Tender Marina. It’s well named as it’s, you guessed it, right next to the Wrightsville Beach bridge. Well, the aforementioned current was in full ebb at around four knots as we squirted through the venturi affected narrow opening, then we made a TopGun 180 degree turn to approach the dock with that devil current on the bow. All went well, in part because we got the bow thruster operational a few days ago. Readiness is all! Now, the ‘Slave Queen’ and brains of the outfit, and keeper of all the patience available in the universe, is in the galley preparing a wonderful dinner. Life is good!
Day 15 and 16:
We survived another long trip through the Rock Pile in Myrtle Beach yesterday and stopped at Osprey Marina to fuel up. Osprey is one of our favorite stops on the ICW. A well maintained facility with friendly staff, and always the best diesel prices. We were away at dawn, and entered the upper reach of the Waccamaw River. This stretch between Osprey and Georgetown feels like stepping into another dimension. Pristine Cypress trees thickly crowd the waters edge, and until you use Google’s satellite view to discover upscale suburbia and golf courses hiding behind those trees, shattering that dream. We’ll take our grand  illusion over reality and continue to indulge our fantasy of wilderness as we pass this way. ‘New Bearings ‘ is headed for the barn today in Charleston. We should be tied up safely this afternoon  and begin our cleanup, then depart by rental car back to Mobjack Bay and Zimmerang, who we hope has been waiting patiently for our return.

Delivery Summary:

Total Distance: 962 NM

Total Running Hours: 102

Average Speed: 9.4 Knots @ 1800-1950 RPM 

To find out more about our services please visit our website at: www.tayloryachtdelivery.com
or email us at captjt@riverreach.net

Nordhavn 55 Trawler ‘Last Mango’ Delivery from Puerto Vallarta, Mexico to San Diego, CA Captain Jerry Taylor

From Marina Queen to Ocean Going Lady

February, 2010

IMG_1325As the plane circled for landing in Puerto Vallarta, I remarked to Wendy that the town and surroundings looked like it had been on a steroidal growth boom since the last time we were here. After clearing Customs, Wendy, Alan and I taxied to the marina to find the N55 tied up with badly chafed lines, complete with crushed and exploded fenders dangling. The surge was so bad at the dock, that just loading our bags and delivery gear on board was a death defying act. The boat was literally rolling around so violently that we wanted to get to sea as soon as possible, just to regain our equilibrium.
Before turning in that evening, we doubled the mooring lines with what we found on IMG_1273IMG_1287board. At 0300 hrs. a most unusual and un forecast weather system blasted Nuevo Vallarta Marina, and Banderas Bay with 75 knot winds and torrential rain. Oddly enough the tattered dock lines held!
We spent the next three days in pre departure checks and gathering spares and provisioning for the trip North.
Here are some of the tasks that were accomplished before starting the 1046 NM run to San Diego:
IMG_1288IMG_1289**Changed raw water impellers on generator, get-home
engine, and main engine
**Replaced generator belt
**Replaced generator final fuel filter
**Changed all 4 primary Racor elements
**Pumped 1 Gal excess oil from transmission
**Rebuilt 24volt bilge pump
**Rebuilt inoperative gray and black water pumps
**Pumped up steering reservoir to the specified 30psi
IMG_1296IMG_1303A sticky issue arose when we discovered that none of the boats papers, including the Mexican cruising permit were on board, and in spite of considerable pressure from the selling broker, we refused to leave until the correct paperwork was provided.
After checking with Weather Bob at Ocean Marine Nav, and topping the fuel tanks, we departed at 1300 on Friday Feb 05. We ran 24/7 to arrive in San Diego and clear Customs IMG_1310IMG_1311early on the morning of Thursday Feb 11. The N55 proved an excellent sea boat, very steady and always giving us a sense of confidence, even in the moderate to rough conditions that are typical on this trip.

Delivery Summary
Total Distance: 1046 NM
Total Running Hours: 141
Average Speed: 7.4 knots @ 1800 RPM
Last Mango Nordhavn 55 2010Average Fuel Burn: 7.8 GPH
Total Fuel Burned: 1100 Gal 

To find out more about our services please visit our website at www.tayloryachtdelivery.com
or email us at captjt@riverreach.net

Read a testimonial from the owners of ‘Last Mango’

Watch the video:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nqS3GhbD_W8

Nordhavn 47 Trawler ‘Serena Ray’ Delivery from Hilton Head, SC to Newport, RI Captain Jerry Taylor

Surviving the attack of the golden slime with Captain Jerry Taylor

August, 2012

Over the past 30 years Wendy and I have been called to deliver boats for a wide variety of reasons. A few examples are: a) Lightning strike, b) Boat owner scares his wife by crossing the Gulf Stream in nasty weather, c) Grounding, d) Abandonment, and now in the case of ‘Serena Ray’ we have to add: e) Previous captain closes fuel return valves and ‘blows up’ injector pump.Serena Ray Nordhavn 47
Within hours of receiving the call, Wendy, our crew Harvey and I were on our way to Skull Creek Marina in Hilton  Head , SC with tool kit and delivery gear, ready to solve problems and get underway for Newport, RI.
The next day we assisted the Lugger mechanic with installing the new rebuilt injector pump, cleaned up the diesel in the bilge and engine room, provisioned, and secured everything for an offshore passage. We set all the valves to their correct positions and double checked them, changed the primary and secondary fuel filters, cleaned the air conditioning and generator sea strainers and pumped up the steering reservoir to the proper operating pressure.
At 1000 August 2, after returning the rental car, we departed Skull Creek Marina with a perfect weather forecast for the 800 NM offshore delivery to Newport, RI.
After 10 hours 
underway, it became obvious that we had a serious fuel contamination problem, and additionally the stabilizer system oil temperature was elevated. The Racor Serena Ray Nordhavn 47 Golden slimevacuum gauges were all indicating the need for a filter change but upon inspection the elements instead of being black and nasty as we expected, were light brown in color and ‘looked fine’. We were able to run for about 6 hours on a new 10 micron Racor element before showing high vacuum and in one instance, complete main engine shut down. The calm conditions continued around Cape Hatteras, while we struggled to identify the cause of the fuel problem, which finally revealed itself with the swipe of a gloved finger through the pleats of the filter. The element was coated with a substance that can best be described as honey, and from then on was known a ‘Golden Slime’.
At 0800 August 05, seventy two hours after our departure from Hilton Head, we pulled into Little Creek, VA to find a fuel tank cleaning service and to trouble shoot the high oil temperature with the stabilizer cooling system. We hired Dave of USA Fuel Service in Norfolk to ‘polish’ the 1000 gal on board, and to open and clean the tanks. His educated guess on the source of the ‘Golden Slime’ was that the tanks had been filled with biodiesel which will gel if not used within 90 days. Many of our delivery problems have been fuel related but this was our first  encounter with ‘Golden Slime,’ and hopefully our last. While Dave was busy with his fuel wand and portable dockside filter system, we discovered that the stabilizer cooling pump made lots of noise but did not Serena Ray Nordhavn 47 Golden Slimepump any water. Fortunately there was a spare March Pump in the very extensive spares inventory, we installed it and tested it, and instantly there was cooling water.
At 1000 August 7 we departed from Little Creek for Newport with a continuing good weather forecast. The remaining 360 miles were pleasantly uneventful, and we arrived at Newport Shipyard on August 9 at 1500. We spent the next day cleaning the exterior, cleaning and organizing the interior, and generally making the ‘Serena Ray’ soon to be renamed ‘Never Say Never’, ready for the new owners arrival.

Serena Ray Nordhavn 47 2012Delivery Summary
Total Distance: 835 NM
Total Running Hours: 125
Average Speed: 6.68 Knots at 1800 RPM

To watch a short video of this trip
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fqm4H3z4G0M

To find out more about our services please visit our website at
www.tayloryachtdelivery.com or email us at captjt@riverreach.net

Grand Banks 46 Trawler ‘Avalanche’ Delivery from Rockland, ME to Mathews, VA Captain Jerry Taylor

Nautical Problem Solving with Captain Jerry Taylor

July, 2012

Avalanche GB46 July 2012

Call us ‘adrenalin junkies’ if you must, we prefer to think of ourselves as ‘nautical problem solvers’. Getting any delivery boat from point ‘A’ to point ‘B’ is usually an interesting ‘nautical problem,’ but it is necessary to look carefully at all systems before departure, as the devil is always in the details.
The new owner of ‘Avalanche’ met us at Journeys End Marina in Rockland, Maine to get to know us, and to give us the keys to his newly purchased 1993 Grand Banks 46 Classic. He then wished us well, and departed.
Wendy and I spent the remainder of the day, and all of the next day going over the mechanical and electrical systems.

Avalanche GB46 July 2012We replaced the badly worn stabilizer pump belts,Avalanche GB46 July 2012 changed the very black Racor elements, and the on-engine fuel filter elements, topped the fuel and water tanks, familiarized ourselves with the electronics, provisioned the galley, secured the dingy, stowed all loose gear and generally made ready for sea.

Avalanche GB46 July 2012

The next morning at 0500, after coffee, we departed with perfect July weather, no fog, and moderate seas with a light northerly breeze. We ran 100 NM to Isle of Shoals where we were able to pick up a mooring.

While underway to Isle of Shoals, and during one of the hourly engine room checks, weAvalanche GB46 July 2012 discovered a diesel leak from the Starboard Cat injector pump. After shut down, we attempted a repair to the bleed valve but had no luck, so we called and ordered a replacement from Fairhaven Marine, a 92 NM run the next day. Again the weather was perfect and we arrived in Fairhaven in time to take on fuel before moving to our slip. The next morning we replaced the suspect valve, and a blown fuse in the AC water pump relay box before getting underway for Clinton, CT at 1000.
Our luck with the weather continued and we were able to run from Clinton to Manesquan, NJ – 120 NM – where we topped the fuel tanks, and then with another 0515 departure and help from some very strong coffee, departed from Manesquan to Chesapeake City, MD – 147 NM. The New Jersey coast was benign, we caught the current from Cape May up the Delaware perfectly and made excellent time to the Chesapeake Inn on the C and D canal, where we arrived amid what seemed like a thousand people, eating drinking and showing off their shiny ear-splitting neon rainbow-colored chrome plated speed boats. Quite a shock after being by ourselves for the last 5 days, and not quite what we expected on a Thursday night. With the 375 HP Cats humming along at 1900 rpm, and the weather still beautiful, we made our way down the Chesapeake 90 NM to Spring Cove Marina in Solomons, MD. 

Another 0545 departure on a cool, overcast morning with Avalanche GB46 July 2012the final objective in our sights only another 90 miles away. We arrived at Zimmerman Marine, near Mathews, VA early afternoon, in time to wash 700 miles of salt off the exterior. We began to clean and organize the interior, which we completed along with the ‘dreaded list’ of recommendations. 
Our attention to detail, careful preparation, and the weather in a friendly mood, all helped to make this delivery fairly uneventful. The GB46 is a strong, honest boat with a fine pedigree and excellent sea keeping ability.
Delivery Summary
Avalanche GB 46 July 2012Total Distance: 724 NM
Total Running Hours: 73.3
Average Speed: 9.8 knots
Average Fuel Burn: 13 GPH

To find out more about our services please visit our website at www.tayloryachtdelivery.com or email us at captjt@riverreach.net

To watch a short video of this Delivery: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FXuWRZk1lkQ

Grand Banks 42 Trawler ‘Ariel Lee’ Delivery from Rowayton, CT. to Mathews, VA.

Captain Jerry Taylor’s Icy Adventure

February, 2012

On Feb 08 2012, armed with 6 bags of warm clothes, bedding, tools, galley equipment and other cold weather lifeBlog 4 support equipment we arrived at  the GB42 ‘Ariel Lee’ in Rowayton, CT. After making a brief inventory with the new owner, it was off to the nearest West Marine to purchase basic required safety equipment and spare parts. The next morning we completed our pre departure check list and got under way for Liberty Landing New Jersey, to top the fuel and water tanks. We also wanted to get a few hours running on a boat which had been sitting shrink wrapped and winterized for months, before venturing off the New Jersey coast . No major problems developed, so the next morning at 0630 we departed for Cape May, New Jersey. Running conditions offshore were good as far as Barnegat Inlet, and then the wind  picked up to around 15 to 20 knots on the nose. Due to the strength, quality, and general heft of the GB 42, there was no need to reduce our speed below 12KTS, and we arrived safely at South Jersey Marina that afternoon, where we were able to take on fuel.Blog 3
The next morning the ‘weather window’  slammed shut for two days, with winds forecast at NW 30 – 40 knots, snow and freezing rain. We spent Saturday properly securing the new dinghy, rebuilding the overboard discharge pump, cleaning the fresh water strainer, replacing the shower sump pump, repairing life lines and removing the bimini canvas. Needless to say, outdoor projects were accomplished in small bursts with frequent warm up breaks inside the cozy salon of the GB. On Sunday we walked through snow and freezing wind  to the Laundromat and grocery store, then spent the afternoon staying warm.
Monday morning, conditions had moderated, so we departed South Jersey at 0630 for Annapolis. We took plenty of spray going up the Delaware and by the time we reached Annapolis Landing Marina we resembled an ice sculptor. We topped the fuel tanks but once again no water on the dock.Blog 2
Tuesday the weather moderated, and we had a pleasant run to Deltaville Marina where we topped the fuel and water tanks. We always try to leave the tanks as full as possible, as this is one less thing for the owner to worry about.
Wednesday mornings arrival at Zimmerman Marine was slightly delayed by low tide, so we began our cleanup on the mooring outside the entrance in the East River, off Mobjack Bay. After completing our cleanup, we went over the ‘dreaded list’ with Zimmerman Marine and the owner Rob Kesler. That evening we had a delightful dinner with the Keslers at their house in Norfolk and departed the next morning in a rental car for Ft Lauderdale.

Ariel Lee GB 42 EU 2012

Delivery Statistics:
Total Distance: 405 NM,
Total Running Hours: 33.6 Hrs at 2200 rpm
Average Speed: 12 knots at 2200 RPM
Average GPH: 18 – 20 GPH with 450 Yanmars including  generator time.

To find out more about our services please see our web site at www.tayloryachtdelivery.com or email us at captjt@riverreach.net

Read a testimonial from the owners of ‘Ariel Lee’