Krogen 48 Trawler ‘Marie Louise’ Delivery from St Petersburg, FL to Portsmouth, NH by Captain Jerry Taylor

We renew our acquaintance with an old friend

May/June 2018

Day 1:
We decided to practice what we preach and waited a wet and windy week for a gigantic low pressure system to vacate the Florida Gulf Coast. The drive across Aligator Alley early this morning was pleasantly uneventful, and we arrived at the Krogen 48 ‘Marie Louise II’, ex ‘Midnight Sun’ in St Petersburg mid day.
ML II is a Krogen 48 that we were involved with for over six years when she was brand new in 2002. We delivered her back and forth from New Hampshire to Florida and a trip to Maine with the original owners. For some unknown reason we continue with a warm friendship with these lovely people. Tomorrow we’ll provision and do some basic prep work, with an early start on Sunday morning to be on our way back to New Hampshire for the present owners. Hopefully this will result in another years long friendship. PS; The weather is now perfect for beginning our next ‘Excellent Adventure.’
Day 2:
While Wendy emptied the shelves at Fresh Market and Trader Joe’s with a final pit stop at Publix, I toiled in the engine room and made sure “All the dogs were barking.” We changed out an old plastic hose with a reinforced rubber hose that feeds cooling water to the stuffing box, (not a five minute job), replaced the air cleaner in the Walker Air Sep, tightened every hose clamp within reach, and ran and checked all systems, of which there are a bunch. Old home week on a great boat with a lot of miles and memories. It was evident that the current owners have invested much time and energy in bringing her back up to ‘yacht condition’. Hopefully we’ll make our escape early tomorrow morning. St Petersburg is a lovely city, but we have 1725 miles to go before we sleep.
Day 3:
A good 12 hour run today overall, although it got a bit snotty the last four hours before we could turn into the Boca Grand channel. We’re tied snugly to the dock at Boca Grand marina. It’s a good thing they don’t know we’re ‘boat trash.’ This is definitely high roller country with prices to match. We are dining aboard tonight after checking the menus and prices on Yelp at the various local bistros. Entering the OWW tomorrow, Okeechobee Waterway for those of you new to the neighborhood. Dockage and anchorage is a tad sketchy along this 150 Mile stretch. Hard to plan ahead as the marinas are few and far between, and many deigned not return phone inquiries as to space available. “Tis what it Tis,” and  we press onward tomorrow.
Day 4 and 5:
If canal cruising is your thing, then the Okeechobee is for you. We tied up two nights ago night at the Moorehaven city dock. At $1.00 per foot including power it’s a bargain.
An early start the next day was nullified by transiting locks and a railroad bridge under repair making a long day longer.
Tied up last night at Sunset Bay Marina in Stuart, a first rate facility with prices to match. Northbound this morning at last, there’s a large area of disturbed weather coming to Florida and the Gulf in a few more days. It’s time to vacate the premises and be on our way.
Day 6:
Last night was spent peacefully at anchor. The night before we were at the dock in Stuart. We stand on the side of Steve McQueen, who once said, “I’d rather wake up in the middle of nowhere than in any city on earth!” Yesterday we ran 100nm, a 14 hour day at the helm. We share one hour watches throughout the day when doing the ICW ‘inside,’ ‘outside’ routine. If the trip is to be run offshore, ‘outside,’ we take a third crew person and run 24/7. A lot of couples cruisers run 24 hour legs offshore, then spend 24 hours tied up or at anchor, trying to regain their sense of humor. Fatigue plays a huge part in bad decisions and screwups. We try to avoid fatigue, as there are plenty of chances for screwups available even when well rested.
We’re privileged to be able to deliver million dollar boats for some very nice folks who put their trust in us, and maintaining that trust is a full time job.
Day 07:
Well, it went something like this, after we’d upped anchor, and were underway a few hours, “If we go outside at Ponce Inlet, we could make St Augustine. “It’s another 12 hour day, but what the hell, let’s go for it!” It was a fantastic day offshore, and well worth another long day at the helm. Marie Louise has a durable John Deere engine and a world class active fin stabilization system, so even when the ocean decides to get ‘Nautical,’ we’re good to go. Tomorrow will be a short day. We’ll stop in Jacksonville and replenish the fruits and veggie locker, and do a few domestic chores to keep a happy ship and a happy crew.
Day 8:
An early stop at Palm Cove Marina in Jacksonville Beach let us attend to some provisioning and boat chores yesterday. The photo is of the air conditioning sea strainer. It was packed with moss and tiny barnacles. South Floridas warm water promotes this kind of growth in a very short time. We once found a good sized fish in a sea strainer, it had gotten in as a minnow and grew and grew. Another example of blind ambition leading to an unscheduled end. We’re offshore again today as we speak. The stinky pulp mill stacks of Fernandina 5 miles off our port beam. Today’s exact destination unknown, until we select a spot to anchor for the night somewhere up a creek in Georgia’s lonely marshlands. Meanwhile, Sub Tropical Storm Alberto is festering away near the Gulf of Mexico, we’ll have to see how that will affect our excellent adventures in the next few days.
Day 9:
We had a pretty good run today. Out at the St John’s river Florida and in at St Simons Georgia. 92 NM in nice conditions. However, this being a boat, the air conditioning decided to take a vacation. Now we know that doesn’t sound serious to most folks, but at this time of year the large biting flies are out for our blood. Without screening, they will have their way with us. So as we motor along, they plastered on all windows wanting in, and us held captive inside sweating. For some reason they depart at sundown and return an hour or two after sunrise. We power on, with thousands of small viscous hitchhiking vampires awaiting their chance.
Day 10:
Another short day today. We stopped in Thunderbolt Ga after contacting Jesse from Edge HVAC this Sunday morning. He was recommended by our friend Ken Youngchild of Thunderbolt Marine. Jesse arrived at 1400 and had the A/C up and running by 1500, this accomplished on a major three day holiday weekend. It pays to have friends in low places. Thanks Ken! Thanks Jesse! The rain and squally weather from Alberto finally caught up with us. Every great boating day is not necessarily a sunny day.
Day 11:
Here we are anchored for the night on Toogoodoo Creek in beautiful South Carolina.
The best part of today was discovering that the dreaded shallows of the Coosaw Cut had just been dredged. We transited around two hours after low tide and found 12 to 15 Ft. However a dredge was partially blocking the southern entrance as we approached. Tried calling on the VHF on channel 13 and 16 with no response, and as we slowly passed by discovered that we’re skidding through soft mud in front of the dredge. No harm done, but it would have been nice to speak to the dredge. The weather was overcast, but no rain. All in all, a good 77 NM run without incident.
Day 13:
We left early this morning from Harborwalk Marina in Georgetown, SC, a nice place with excellent staff, by the way. We stopped at Grand Dunes Marina to refuel which took over two hours, and you guessed it, buy fresh groceries at the Lowes Market across the street. The dock master Lynn, and her daughter made us feel right at home, and are friendly and helpful beyond the call of duty. We later discovered some issues in the engine room and took care of them. Where does the time go?
Day 14:
An early exit from Grand Dunes in Myrtle Beach netted us over 80 NM today to fetch up at Harbor Village. Tomorrow we hope to push past Beaufort, NC and be anchored or tied up another 80 or 90 miles along. Today we passed the ‘half way’ point of this delivery. Sometimes this is accompanied by the mid trip blues. So far, the blues have been kept at bay, due in part to the amount of concentration necessary in keeping ‘Marie Louise’ off the shallow and ever changing bottom. Twenty Years ago we sailed the ICW with a 7′ draft. Today if we tried that, we’d become temporary real estate. There are at least six areas now that with a 4 1/2 to 5′ draft you must ‘play’ the tides to get through safely.
Day 15:
We’re anchored in splendid solitude tonight in Campbell Creek, NC, another 100 NM toward our objective. Our before dawn departure netted us a fantastic sunrise, then after an hour or two the auto pilot went on a temporary leave of absence. “Drat, shucks  and Dog gone!” we exclaimed in mutual dismay and disappointment. Once we got out on to the wide Neuse River we had a chance to do some troubleshooting. Swatting the same blood thirsty flies I climbed down in to the lazz and found the culprit. An overheated and stuck ‘open’ 12v solenoid which was repaired by a sharp rap with the handle of a screwdriver. We called a tech in Chesapeake, VA and will meet him on Monday morning and replace the ‘sticky’ solenoid.
Day 16:
Somehow we managed to endure the seemingly endless Alligator Pungo Cut today with patience and Zen like calm. A narrow channel and 20 miles of Kudzu and stumps close on either side. It feels like being sprung from a dark green dungeon when at last you find your way out. The mighty Albermarle Sound gave us a pass today, with light southerly breezes. We’ve been thrashed there numerous times. Anchored tonight south of Coinjock, NC, we  decided to give their gigantic prime rib a miss. Not a difficult decision for us. Tomorrow we’ll stop early at Atlantic Yacht Basin and go in search of a new solenoid for the auto pilot. We’ve just completed 1060 NM with only 665 to go. Onwards!
Day 18:
Today we escaped from the ICW. We swept by Mile 0 in Norfolk and motored happily onto the beautiful blue green Chesapeake. After the technician from Ayers Electronics found a bad power connection, then set up and calibrated the auto pilot we were good to go. So, go we did. We made the noon opening of the Great Bridge Bridge and locked on through the Great Bridge Lock. We’re anchored this evening on Chisman Creek off the Poquoson River. Quiet and Secure. Wendy is simmering a Beef Bourgogne fo our dinner this evening, I just saw her pour in a half bottle of red wine, “Oh boy, oh boy!”
Day 19:
For us, the Chesapeake is like coming home. If we could abolish winter we’d live here forever. In addition to the times we pass through on deliveries, the Bay is our summer home aboard our own boat, and has been for the past 16 years. Last night’s sunset on Chisman Creek was worth the price of admission. Tonight we’re tied up at Spring Cove Marina in Solomons MD and a short walk away is Island Sushi, also worth the price of admission.
Day 20:
We did another 90 NM run today from Solomons to Chesapeake City on the C and D Canal. Our plan was to go further and anchor at Reedy Point on the Delaware River. To accomplish this we were under way at 0530. However, tomorrows timing of the current on the Delaware had other ideas. Better to stop here tonight and “Push” 2 hours of strong current in the morning, rather than motoring on tonight and then “Push” 4 hours of opposing current tomorrow. We hope to make Atlantic City tomorrow, then on to New York the following day.
Day 21:
The booming bass notes coming from the casino bar at the head of the dock are rattling our windows. Can’t call it music exactly, at risk of admitting that anything newer than the late seventies and eighties just doesn’t sound like music to us. We did 110 NM today, with a favorable current on the Delaware pulling us along at 10 to 11 knots most of the morning. The New Jersey coast was benign for a change, with similar wind and seas forecast for tomorrow. We caught up with the ‘Misty Pearl’ a Selene 43 we trained the new owners on last March. They are off on the first part of the Great Loop adventure. We joined them this evening with 6 other loopers.
Day 22:
What a day! Light southerly breezes and a strong northerly setting current that helped us along the entire 87 NM from Atlantic City to the warm and friendly Great Kills Yacht Club. The loopers we met last night were reluctant to do the run in one day and planned to stop in Manasquan, even after we cautioned them about the strong river currents and narrow opening rail road bridge. The perfect weather coaxed most of them to go the full distance outside. We helped a couple of them tie up and we’re as proud as they are. For some it was a first experience on the Atlantic. Big smiles all round the dock tonight. Tomorrow we’re off to Long Island Sound and the loopers head up the Hudson. It was fun sharing the day with them.
Day 23:
Who among us can resist taking photos of New York and the Statue of Liberty? Every time we enter or leave NY Harbor, travelling up the Hudson or taking the East River to Long Island Sound, it brings on feelings of pride in this great country we’re fortunate enough to be part of. After leaving the Great Kills Yacht Club we made our way to the Hudson with favorable current all the way to the East River, where it turned against us with a vengeance. Not our first time through Hell’s Gate, but it’s always best to catch the ride with following current. This time we made our way against it through tide rips and whirlpools, dodging oncoming shipping who were clever enough to be going the opposite direction. Once under the Throgs Neck Bridge, the current became our friend and we hitched on for a wonderful day on Long Island Sound, making 9 to 91/2 knots all the way to Cedar Island Marina in Clinton, CT.
Day 24:
Another fine day in New England. Long Island Sound and Buzzards Bay were on their very best behavior, if you were in a power boat that is. The glassy calm and zero wind was totally frustrating for all the sail boats we saw today. Brought back a lot of memories of our sailing days. Anchored tonight in Onset Harbor, in hope of a quiet night and another early departure. We should arrive close to our destination tomorrow evening, tie up at Wentworth by the Sea Marina, then catch the flood tide the next morning for the last 7 miles.
Day 25:
Away at first light again this morning. Mighty fine anchorage in Onset Harbor, and we slept like tigers. Careful planning or dumb luck, take your pick, found us rocketing through the Cape Cod Canal at 11 to 12 knots on our way to Portsmouth. Should have taken pictures, but they would have been blurred by the G forces and our fantastic forward velocity. On our exit from the canal like a pinched  watermelon seed, we were ejected into Cape Cod Bay and on towards Cape Anne. Tonight we dine ashore at the Wentworth by the Sea Hotel Restaurant. They’ll never guess that we’re boat trash by our rasty attitude and wrinkled attire. In the morning we do the last 7 miles to the owner’s slip upriver at Great Bay Marina.
Day 26:
Well, we’re here. The current on the Piscataqua River is absolutely awesome! We caught the turn to flood this morning and by the time we were approaching the dock at Great Bay Marina it was out of control. As we approached the dock with 4 knots of current on the bow, it suddenly reversed itself due to a weird back eddy. Suddenly, now feet from the dock, we were going with the flow rather than opposing it. Downright interesting, but luckily uneventful. We spent the day cleaning the interior and exterior of ‘Marie Louise’, and tomorrow morning will do the ships laundry and make everything ready for the owners return in two weeks. We were incredibly fortunate to be ahead of or behind any bad weather, and blessed by only one or two small mechanical and electrical problems thanks to the careful preparation and attention to detail by the current owners.

Delivery Summary:

Total Distance: 1814 NM

Total Running Hours: 231

Average Speed: 7.8 Knots @ 2100 – 2150 RPM

Average Fuel Burn: 5 GPH 

To find out more about our services please visit our website at: www.tayloryachtdelivery.com
email us at captjt@riverreach.net
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Horizon 64 Motor Yacht ‘Semper Fi’ Delivery from Fajardo, PR to Ft Lauderdale, FL Captain Jerry Taylor

IMG_1470With Yacht Delivery; even the best laid plans……..

August 2010

I had no idea the amazing number of surprises that lay in wait for us when we stepped aboard the 64′ Horizon Motor Yacht ‘Semper Fi.’
Wendy, Alan and I had flown to San Juan, PR with our delivery gear and a big bag of spare parts, after the full time captain of the past four years had told the owner that the boat could ‘not IMG_0013IMG_1362make it to Florida.’
The sleek 64′ ex charter boat bobbed expectantly in it’s slip at Puerto Del Rey Marina, as if to say, “Welcome aboard suckers, I’ve been expecting you.” We originally had estimated our preparation time at two to three days. This proved a tad optimistic, especially after finding the house battery bank installed on the floor of the main salon! A quick glance in the engine room revealed one of the worst scenes of chaos we have ever seen, and prompted our immediate desire to return to the airport, which we resisted, as in 30 plus years of yacht delivery we have never abandoned a boat. One of the two shore power cords was completely melted, so there was no air conditioning on board when we IMG_1385IMG_1409arrived, and this only added to our general testiness. The disgruntled ex-captain, after reluctantly returning the ships papers and ignition keys that he had removed and hidden before our arrival, departed with the words “I really hope you make it, but I don’t think you will!” As soon as he was gone, we got ourselves to work. Twelve days of ‘dawn to dark’ laboring and ‘bilge ratting,’ finally saw us ready to depart for Ft Lauderdale.
This is a brief accounting of how we began the necessary preparations:
** Replaced 2 inoperative bilge pumps, 1 inoperative float IMG_1428IMG_1438switch and 1  shower sump pump.
** Rebuilt the cooling system on the 20K Generator including the heat exchanger core bundle, replaced the cracked and weeping exhaust elbow, replaced raw water pump, alternator belt, replaced the raw water hose from sea strainer to raw water pump, and repaired or replaced obvious broken and “cooked” wiring.
** Cleaned gallons of dirty engine oil and water under both main engine pans.
** Replaced the raw water impellers on both main engines.
** Jury rigged an insulated welding blanket around the starboard Cat’s deteriorated exhaust elbow. Previously, the insulation had deteriorated and fallen off, with the result of melting the plastic sight glass, dumping gallons of diesel  fuel in the bilge. We replaced the sight glass, of course.
IMG_1444IMG_1422** Tightened every accessible hose clamp throughout the vessel, and assisted the local Cat mechanic with some long delayed repairs.
** Had a diver clean the bottom and running gear, which took 5 hours of scraping and two or three tanks of air.
** Replaced the plastic garden hose on the propane system with approved hose, and filled the propane tanks.
When the numerous electrical problems overcame my ability to cope. I called the owner and requested reinforcement.
He  
agreed to have our friend and omni competent electrical genius, Scott Wiley fly down the next day. When Scotty arrived with additional spare parts and his fantastic energy, we set about working on the following:

Loose battery in engine roomIMG_1447** Replaced the Hynautic reservoir and bled the throttle and shift system to bring it back to life.
** Replaced the rusted and worn out shift rods on both ZF transmissions.
** Diagnosed the problem in the main charging system as a melted contact on the main battery switch, not allowing any charge from the port alternator to the main 24v DC battery bank.
** Diagnosed the inverter/charger as ‘fried.’ Scotty wired around that problem and continued.
** Provided a back up charging system for the electronics to keep us going if the generator IMG_1403IMG_1452failed.
After all of the above was completed, along with numerous other small tasks going on simultaneously, we took her out for a short sea trial. We ran the Cats for an hour or so at our planned cruise rpm with no hiccups, and returned to the marina to top up the fuel tanks and go to our slip.
We provisioned the boat, and departed Puerto Rico early morning on Sunday August 15, setting our course for Ocean World Marina in the Dominican Republic. As soon as we cleared the protected waters of the East end of the island, it was clear that we had totally overlooked repairing one important item – the closing mechanism for the large glass sliding door! The only way to hold the door closed was to use IMG_1457the turn latch on the inside. The latch mechanism and the outside key hardware were all missing! This made running the boat from the upper station nearly impossible, so the decision was made to all stay at the lower station. Thirty three hours later we cleared Customs, fixed a few small items including rigging a temporary compass light, and spent a quiet night in the marina. After clearing out with the Dominican officialdom who were very nice, no ‘mordida’ as in the old days, we cast off for the Bahamas. 44 hours of untroubled running later, we docked at Georgetown, Exuma for fuel and clearance into the Bahamas. We had a great dinner ashore at Eddy’s Edgewater, a good nights rest, and Semper Fi Horizon 62 2010departed the next morning for Highbourne Cay, where we topped the fuel and water tanks, had dinner on board, and set out early the next morning for the final 215 NM to Ft Lauderdale. We arrived off Port Everglades at dawn, made our way to the dock on SE 14th St, called US Customs, obtained our clearance and went ashore for breakfast.
‘Semper Fi’ ran without missing a beat, thanks to our diligent preparation and the fact that the weather was almost perfect, with only one rough stretch off Caicos.
The next day we turned her over to a happy, satisfied and very relieved owner.
Delivery Summary
Total Distance: 1002 NM
Total Running Hours: 107
Average Speed: 9.3 knots @ 900 RPM
To find out more about our services please visit our website at www.tayloryachtdelivery.com
or email us at captjt@riverreach.net

Nordhavn 55 Trawler ‘Last Mango’ Delivery from Puerto Vallarta, Mexico to San Diego, CA Captain Jerry Taylor

From Marina Queen to Ocean Going Lady

February, 2010

IMG_1325As the plane circled for landing in Puerto Vallarta, I remarked to Wendy that the town and surroundings looked like it had been on a steroidal growth boom since the last time we were here. After clearing Customs, Wendy, Alan and I taxied to the marina to find the N55 tied up with badly chafed lines, complete with crushed and exploded fenders dangling. The surge was so bad at the dock, that just loading our bags and delivery gear on board was a death defying act. The boat was literally rolling around so violently that we wanted to get to sea as soon as possible, just to regain our equilibrium.
Before turning in that evening, we doubled the mooring lines with what we found on IMG_1273IMG_1287board. At 0300 hrs. a most unusual and un forecast weather system blasted Nuevo Vallarta Marina, and Banderas Bay with 75 knot winds and torrential rain. Oddly enough the tattered dock lines held!
We spent the next three days in pre departure checks and gathering spares and provisioning for the trip North.
Here are some of the tasks that were accomplished before starting the 1046 NM run to San Diego:
IMG_1288IMG_1289**Changed raw water impellers on generator, get-home
engine, and main engine
**Replaced generator belt
**Replaced generator final fuel filter
**Changed all 4 primary Racor elements
**Pumped 1 Gal excess oil from transmission
**Rebuilt 24volt bilge pump
**Rebuilt inoperative gray and black water pumps
**Pumped up steering reservoir to the specified 30psi
IMG_1296IMG_1303A sticky issue arose when we discovered that none of the boats papers, including the Mexican cruising permit were on board, and in spite of considerable pressure from the selling broker, we refused to leave until the correct paperwork was provided.
After checking with Weather Bob at Ocean Marine Nav, and topping the fuel tanks, we departed at 1300 on Friday Feb 05. We ran 24/7 to arrive in San Diego and clear Customs IMG_1310IMG_1311early on the morning of Thursday Feb 11. The N55 proved an excellent sea boat, very steady and always giving us a sense of confidence, even in the moderate to rough conditions that are typical on this trip.

Delivery Summary
Total Distance: 1046 NM
Total Running Hours: 141
Average Speed: 7.4 knots @ 1800 RPM
Last Mango Nordhavn 55 2010Average Fuel Burn: 7.8 GPH
Total Fuel Burned: 1100 Gal 

To find out more about our services please visit our website at www.tayloryachtdelivery.com
or email us at captjt@riverreach.net

Read a testimonial from the owners of ‘Last Mango’

Watch the video:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nqS3GhbD_W8

Maxum 46 Motor Yacht ‘Hot Under Pressure’ Delivery from Ft Lauderdale, FL to Savannah, GA and on to Hong Kong Captain Jerry Taylor

“Don’t Miss the Boat!”  with Captain Jerry Taylor

January, 2010

IMG_1245We received a voicemail from a gentleman who identified himself as John Chan. His English was excellent, but I must admit his request did harken me back to old Charlie Chan black and white murder mystery movies of yesteryear, when he said, “I’ve just purchased this boat in Ft. Lauderdale, and I need it shipped to Hong Kong.” Did he want us to deliver it to Hong Kong? “No,” he replied, “But it must be on the ship that is departing the Port of Savannah five days from now. Can you do that?” We agreed that it was possible, and set about making our preparations immediately.
As usual, the boat needed some mechanical and safety issues attended to before leaving IMG_0073Ft Lauderdale. This included replacing the raw water pumps on both main engines, and gathering spare parts such as impellers, belts and spare Racor fuel elements. By early afternoon on Saturday, January 16, we were ready to go and left the dock at 1430 to run the 25 miles  to Del Rey.
Sunday morning  we topped the fuel tanks at the Boynton Marina Village fuel dock, and ran the 120 miles up to Melbourne Harbor Marina. The day began with heavy, driving rain resulting in as little as one quarter mile visibility, followed by 20 to 30 knots of wind from the West. Well, it was January, and one of those Florida winters that had it’s fair IMG_0068share of ripping ‘cold fronts.’
0640 Monday morning we departed the dock for the 173 miles to Palm Cove Marina in Jacksonville Beach. Just after entering the Palm Valley Cut, the generator shut down, so after taking on fuel, we replaced the generator impeller and proved it’s operation. A second nasty surprise was discovered when the dock attendant insisted that we have a ‘pump out.’ The macerator pump had appeared to be functioning but as there was no way to monitor the level of the holding tank, we had been using the shore side facilities. This turned out to be a very smart move as the dock pump out ran on, and on, and on. The macerator only made noise, and the tank was full!
Tuesday morning we departed at 0700 and ran 170 miles to the Savannah Hyatt, on the IMG_1261Savannah River. We began our interior and exterior cleanup, picked up a rental car from the Savannah Airport and awaited the call for our loading time.
We arrived alongside the loading dock in the port at the appointed hour, and helped the longshoremen attach the slings to lift ‘Hot Under Pressure’ onto the shipping cradle. All IMG_1263went well, and we returned to Ft Lauderdale by rental car to await the next mysterious phone call.
Delivery Summary:
Total Distance: 421 Nautical MilesHot Under Pressure 46' Maxum 2010
Total Running Hours: 33.1
Average Speed: 12.7 knots
To find out more about our services please visit our website at www.tayloryachtdelivery.com
or email us at captjt@riverreach.net

Grand Banks 42 Trawler ‘Ariel Lee’ Delivery from Rowayton, CT. to Mathews, VA.

Captain Jerry Taylor’s Icy Adventure

February, 2012

On Feb 08 2012, armed with 6 bags of warm clothes, bedding, tools, galley equipment and other cold weather lifeBlog 4 support equipment we arrived at  the GB42 ‘Ariel Lee’ in Rowayton, CT. After making a brief inventory with the new owner, it was off to the nearest West Marine to purchase basic required safety equipment and spare parts. The next morning we completed our pre departure check list and got under way for Liberty Landing New Jersey, to top the fuel and water tanks. We also wanted to get a few hours running on a boat which had been sitting shrink wrapped and winterized for months, before venturing off the New Jersey coast . No major problems developed, so the next morning at 0630 we departed for Cape May, New Jersey. Running conditions offshore were good as far as Barnegat Inlet, and then the wind  picked up to around 15 to 20 knots on the nose. Due to the strength, quality, and general heft of the GB 42, there was no need to reduce our speed below 12KTS, and we arrived safely at South Jersey Marina that afternoon, where we were able to take on fuel.Blog 3
The next morning the ‘weather window’  slammed shut for two days, with winds forecast at NW 30 – 40 knots, snow and freezing rain. We spent Saturday properly securing the new dinghy, rebuilding the overboard discharge pump, cleaning the fresh water strainer, replacing the shower sump pump, repairing life lines and removing the bimini canvas. Needless to say, outdoor projects were accomplished in small bursts with frequent warm up breaks inside the cozy salon of the GB. On Sunday we walked through snow and freezing wind  to the Laundromat and grocery store, then spent the afternoon staying warm.
Monday morning, conditions had moderated, so we departed South Jersey at 0630 for Annapolis. We took plenty of spray going up the Delaware and by the time we reached Annapolis Landing Marina we resembled an ice sculptor. We topped the fuel tanks but once again no water on the dock.Blog 2
Tuesday the weather moderated, and we had a pleasant run to Deltaville Marina where we topped the fuel and water tanks. We always try to leave the tanks as full as possible, as this is one less thing for the owner to worry about.
Wednesday mornings arrival at Zimmerman Marine was slightly delayed by low tide, so we began our cleanup on the mooring outside the entrance in the East River, off Mobjack Bay. After completing our cleanup, we went over the ‘dreaded list’ with Zimmerman Marine and the owner Rob Kesler. That evening we had a delightful dinner with the Keslers at their house in Norfolk and departed the next morning in a rental car for Ft Lauderdale.

Ariel Lee GB 42 EU 2012

Delivery Statistics:
Total Distance: 405 NM,
Total Running Hours: 33.6 Hrs at 2200 rpm
Average Speed: 12 knots at 2200 RPM
Average GPH: 18 – 20 GPH with 450 Yanmars including  generator time.

To find out more about our services please see our web site at www.tayloryachtdelivery.com or email us at captjt@riverreach.net

Read a testimonial from the owners of ‘Ariel Lee’

Grand Banks 46 Trawler ‘Cotytto’ Delivery, refit management, on board training. Trappe, MD to Newport, RI

Ready to Go! Don’t think so!

May, 2009

wpid-IMG_1141-2009-05-15-00-00.jpg

In mid May 2009 we loaded our Subaru Outback with tools and delivery gear, and set out for the Eastern Shore of the Chesapeake Bay to rescue the Grand Banks 46 ‘Cotytto’ from an apparently ‘overlong’ stay at a local boatyard. “If your Captain can be here on Sunday night she will be ready to go Monday morning!” were the words of the yard owner to our client.
This was how we found ‘Cotytto’ on Sunday afternoon – hauled out, no props, no batteries, both engine cooling systems apart, no fresh bottom paint and both fuel tanks open! Ready to go! Not Quite!

IMG_1129Why do owners new to boating continue to believe they can drop off their expensive, complex yacht, and expect all work to be accomplished on time and at the estimated cost, unsupervised? In our experience, without an owner or representative on site, disappointment and misunderstanding soon follows a project that is not closely monitored by all concerned.

Seven intensive days, and a demanding three page work list followed, before we were finally able to get underway for Newport, RI.
During the week the new owner expressed disbelief at our detailed progress reports, to which we suggested that he drive down to see for himself. He did, and pitched in to help with some of the heavier projects, such as a new engine room fire bottle.
IMG_1166Tasks completed included: Rebuilding the Caterpillar fresh and raw water pumps and cooling systems, flush both ‘Cat’ after coolers, replace the generator stop solenoid and heat exchanger and filters. Trim tab reservoir replacement, Refrigeration system charge, rub rail repair, windshield wiper replacement, cleaning both fuel tanks, props trued balanced and coated with Prop Speed and reinstalled, replacement of all 12 volt batteries, servicing of all seacocks, rebuilding of autopilot cylinder, and bottom paint touchup.
IMG_1151This is not exactly how most people see the job of a delivery captain, but our motto is, “Whatever it takes to get it done!”.
Once free of the muddy creek and the sticky embrace of the boatyard, we fueled ‘Cotytto’ at Jacks Point Marina in Oxford MD and departed the next morning. That evening we arrived at the Chesapeake Inn Marina, where the weather door slammed shut, and we had to hunker down the next day cleaning and organizing while the gale on the Delaware abated.
At first light Wednesday morning, we departed Chesapeake City and had a rough but uneventful 91 mile run to Atlantic City.
Thursday we ran up to Liberty Landing Marina in New Jersey, where the owner joined us for the 108 miles to Noank CT and then on to his home port of Newport R I.

Cotytto GB 46 2009 Delivery Summary
Total Distance: 406 NM
Total Running Hours: 43
Average Speed: 9.4 knots
Average Fuel Burn: 12.5 GPH
To find out more about our services please visit our website at www.tayloryachtdelivery.com or email us at captjt@riverreach.net